Afro-Latin Festival Discussion – Cigars, Identity and Ex-pats in France

Bootleg Like Jazz’s Terrell Wayne explains his journey to understanding Afro-Latin history, culture and nuisances. In the video we have: Raúl Orlando Edwards (Founder of Afro-Latin Fest), Jose Grinãn (FOX 26 News Anchor), Terrell Wayne (Bootleg Like Jazz), Marlon Smith (Theologian and Scholar) and Laurel K. Rutledge (The Rutledge Perspective Podcast).

Tickets are still available for the Afro-Latin Fest happening today and all this weekend in Houston at the Westin Galleria at 5060 West Alabama. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-6th-annual-afro-latin-fest-tickets-55540897319

Roberto Carlos Garcia – Black Maybe, Afro-Dominican Roots and Casta | Q – Haiti, the Dominican Republic and and musings on travel

Get Fresh Books LLC and Červená Barva Press

Poet, storyteller, and essayist Roberto Carlos Garcia is a self-described “sancocho […] of provisions from the Harlem Renaissance, the Spanish Poets of 1929, the Black Arts Movement, the Nuyorican School, and the Modernists.” Garcia is rigorously interrogative of himself and the world around him, conveying “nakedness of emotion, intent, and experience,” and he writes extensively about the Afro-Latinx and Afro-diasporic experience. His second poetry collection, black / Maybe, is available from Willow Books.  Roberto’s first collection, Melancolía, is available from Červená Barva Press. 

Roberto Carlos Garcia

https://www.getfreshbooksllc.com/

https://www.robertocarlosgarcia.com/

IG: @robertobelike, @getfreshbooksllc, @bootleglikejazz

Music by: Idyll Green https://soundcloud.com/idyll-green

The Gumbo Session – Juneteenth, Lee P. Brown, Chapultepex Club and Charles Law

Terrell Wayne a.k.a. Q in the studio

This is the gumbo session – a mix of current events, topics I’m passionate about and random ideas I’ve been working on. In this episode I talk about former Mayor Lee P. Brown, the Chapultepex Club of the Houston Y.W.C.A., Howard Law and the history behind Juneteenth.

What Juneteenth around the corner I treated this episode of the Gumbo session as a 2nd Black history month. Here in Texas, Juneteenth is a big deal and every June feels like another Black history month.

Subscribe, like, share and leave a comment if something resonated with you. Stay tuned because the next Guest on Bootleg Like Jazz include Austin based artist Midnight Navy and more.

Subscribe to my Youtube channel: https://youtu.be/49QGSy1jhBY

Instagram: @bootleglikejazz

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/terrell-quillin

Music by: Idyll Green https://soundcloud.com/idyll-green

Jasminne Mendez – dicusses her new book, “Night Blooming Jasmin(n)e”, Afro-Dominican roots and Journey with Scleroderma and Lupus

Night Blooming Jasmin(n)e published Art Público Press Houston, TX

For Jasminne Méndez, pericardial effusion and pericarditis are not just an abnormal accumulation of fluid and increased inflammation around the heart. It’s what happens “when you stifle the tears and pain of a miscarriage, infertility and chronic illness for so long that your heart does the crying for you until it begins to drown because its tears have nowhere to go.”

Diagnosed with scleroderma at 22 and lupus just six years later, her life becomes a roller coaster of doctor visits, medical tests and procedures. Staring at EKG results that look like hieroglyphics, she realizes that she doesn’t want to understand them: “The language of a life lived with chronic illness is not something I want to adapt to. I cannot let this hostile vocabulary hijack my story.”

The daughter of Dominican immigrants, Méndez fought for independence against her overly-protective parents, obtaining a full scholarship to college, a dream job after school and a master’s degree shortly thereafter. But the full- time job with medical insurance doesn’t satisfy her urge to write and perform, so she leaves it in search of creative fulfillment. In this stirring collection of personal essays and poetry, Méndez shares her story, writing about encounters with the medical establishment, experiences as an Afro Latina and longing for the life she expected but that eludes her.

JASMINNE MÉNDEZ is a Macondo and Canto Mundo Fellow, as well as a Voices of Our Nations Arts (VONA) alumna. She is the author of a multi-genre memoir, Island of Dreams (2013), winner of an International Latino Book Award. She lives and works in Houston, Texas.

Arte Público Press : https://artepublicopress.com/

Music by : Idyll Green https://soundcloud.com/idyll-green

Promo by : Sam Osborne Instagram: @yzbeatz713

Instagram: @bootleglikejazz

D.E.E.P Deborah Mouton – Poetry, Freestylin’ and her new book “Newsworthy”


Deborah D.E.E.P. Mouton is a mother, wife, educator, and the current, and first Black, Poet Laureate of Houston, Texas. This seven-time National Poetry Slam Competitor, and Head Coach of the Houston VIP Poetry Slam Team, has been ranked the #2 Best Female Performance Poet in the World.

Her work has appeared in Black Girl Magic (Haymarket Books) Houston Noir (Akashic Books), and I AM STRENGTH (Blind Faith Books) to name a few. Her work has also been highlighted on such platforms as BBC, Houston Public Media, ABC, PBS, Blavity, Tedx, and Upworthy. Her next collection, Newsworthy, is set for release Spring of 2019 by Bloomsday Literary.

Her collaborations with The Houston Ballet, The Houston Rockets, and the Houston Grand Opera have opened new doors for performance poetry. Her work has been highlighted and studied in . She had the pleasure of performing and leading a workshop at the Leipzig in Autumn literary festival in 2018, where she bridged the gap between the slam and formal publishing communities.

As the Executive Director of VIP Arts Houston, she seeks to build more bridges that amplify the voices of artists in and around the nation. Her love for community transcends the classroom and the stage making her a mentor to many and a notable force to be felt.


D. Mouton VIP Arts Houston, Executive Director www.livelifedeep.comwww.vipartshouston.org
www.vipartshouston.org

IG: Bootleg Like Jazz and twayne13

Twitter: @TerrellWayne2

Music by: Idyll Green https://soundcloud.com/idyll-green

Images by : yzbeatz713 – you can find him on instagram

Recorded at Barron Studios Houston, Tx

Raúl Orlando Edwards – Afro Latin Fest – Strictly Street Salsa and Flamart

In this episode of Bootleg Like Jazz, Raúl Orlando Edwards Founder of Flamart and Strictly Street Salsa stops by to talk about his Concierto, the history of latin dancing and the upcoming Afro-Latin Fest happening May 23-26, 2019 at the Westin Galleria Houston at 5060 W Alabama St. Find out more at http://www.afrolatinfest.org/

https://www.flamart.org/about-us

Facebook: Strictly Street Salsa

iTunes: Bootleg Like Jazz

Instagram: Bootleg Like Jazz

Music by: Idyll Green https://soundcloud.com/idyll-green

Photos by: YZBeatz713 – you can find him on Instagram

Recorded at Barron Studios Houston, Tx

Artivism_Schetauna Powell – Graphic Novels, Community engagement and the Art scene in NY during the 80’s

In this episode titled Artivism – Artist, Entrepreneur and Author Schetauna discusses her new novel The Experimental City, the impact of Jean-Michel Basquiat on her work and her recent series such as What We Are Not Allowed To Express.

Credits: Schetauna Powell: Facebook = Artivism Community Art Supply | WordPress = artivismcommunityart.com | Youtube = Schetauna Powell

Sam Osborne Engineer

Music by: Idyll Green https://soundcloud.com/idyll-green

iTunes: Bootleg Like Jazz

Sound Cloud: https://soundcloud.com/terrell-quillin

Bootleg Like Jazz – Pourquoi France

A multicultural space for personal expression.

by: Q


Bootleg Like Jazz is the Black American, Minority and Immigrant experience. It’s a mixture of Afro-Latino and the Black Diaspora, fake news and the underground, subjugation and determination. Bootleg Like Jazz is a multicultural space for conversations about diversity in travel and art, languages and culture, society and perspective. Bootleg Like Jazz comes from a combination of Black History and Jazz history. Our experience as a Black American or a African-American,  began in this country as a diminished experience. We were 3/5ths of a human. Subjugated, denied education, denied having family and only given the scraps. Here comes jazz, in order to learn how to play music Black folks had to learn by ear, from watching other people perform and from knowledge passed down. That’s Bootleg Like Jazz. It’s the idea that they gave us scraps but we turned it into Jazz. Jazz as an art form is built off of diminished chords and diminished opportunities. Art is personal. The musicians, you know, couldn’t legally learn to read or write due to slave codes. This intensifies over time. Most jazz chords are diminished in some form so I thought to myself, jazz is really a bootleg art form. Whether it be finger placement that’s funky or how someone decides to play it that way. It all comes from Black American Musicians jamming and figuring out what sounds the best. The original Founders of Jazz probably didn’t have any formal musical education or separate but equal musical education and many jazz musicians in general started out with a feeling. When Jazz was gaining popularity it occurred during some of the most difficult days in the black community. They were able to create something that people from foreign countries, diverse socioeconomic backgrounds and different tongues would come to love about a people who were once subjugated. That’s the African-American experience – the Multicultural experience. It’s a mixture of being neglected yet finding a way to survive – thrive.

Terrell Wayne

iTunes: Bootleg Like Jazz

Sound Cloud: https://soundcloud.com/terrell-quillin